Dual Sport Kit Troubleshooting Guide

SPEEDO:

All kits now come prewired with a triangular female 3-pin plug which allows you to easily power an Acewell 1550T speedometer/tachometer unit. 

If you’d like to run another Acewell speedometer, GPS Unit or other speedometer, you can cut the connector and splice the corresponding wires based on the chart below:

BLACK – GROUND

BLUE- SWITCHED HOT

GREY – CONSTANT HOT


TURN SIGNALS:

Turn signals come on but do not blink, blink only at high RPM's, or do not come on at all.

If the turn signals come on but do not blink or blink only when the bike is at high RPM’s, it is due to either a bad flasher relay or too low of voltage in the electrical system.  Proceed to the following test procedures below.

If the turn signals do not come on at all, the turn signal switch, the main power switch, or the turn signal bulbs may also be the problem.  Proceed to the following test procedures below.  If the test procedures do not show that the flasher is faulty, the system voltage is too low, or the bulbs are bad, go to the turn signal switch testing procedure.

Read first before testing: The following tests should be conducted with a known good battery in the system.  If the battery voltage is below 12V, charge and load test the battery before performing this test. 

The flasher relay is a small cylinder shaped device with two terminals (three on LED flashers) mounted behind the headlight.  One terminal is labeled “L” on the body of the flasher; the other terminal is labeled either “X” or “P”.  There should be battery voltage at the “X/P” terminal any time the main power switch is in the on position.  The flasher sends pulses of voltage through the turn signal switch to the turn signals any time the left or right switch position is selected. 

Test Procedures.  Begin by unplugging the two wires from the flasher.  (On “first generation” Baja Designs kits, the two wires are red & white. On later kits, the two wires are red/green & orange.)  You may use a piece of wire or just remove some of the shrink-wrap covering the terminals and join these two wires together. With the main power switch in the on position and the flasher wires joined, click the turn signal switch into either the left or right position.  If the corresponding turn signals come on but do not blink, the flasher relay is faulty and will need to be replaced. (*Standard or LED flashers can be purchased from Baja Designs or your local auto parts store.)  If the corresponding turn signals do not come on, check for battery voltage at the red/green wire. (When checking for voltage, use the black wire in the headlight connector for ground. Some kits do not ground to the chassis.)  If the red/green wire shows battery voltage with the main power switch on, either the turn signal bulbs are burned out or the turn signal switch is faulty.  Evaluate the bulbs and the internal connections within the turn signals.  If they’re good, go to the turn signal switch testing procedure.  If the red/green wire does not show battery voltage with the main power switch on, go to the main power switch testing procedure.

*LED-only turn signals require an LED-specific flasher relay.  For standard incandescent turn signals (supplied with the dual sport kit), a flasher with a minimum draw requirement of 20W must be used.  Baja Designs recommends the Tridon EL-12 flasher, which is available at many auto parts stores.


HEADLIGHT:


Dual Sport Kit headlights can have several different operating characteristics depending on what bike it’s on, which “generation” of Dual Sport Kit you have, and if the stator has been rewound/modified.  In some systems the headlight operates on the same DC (battery) hot lead that the rest of the kit accessories operate on.  In other systems the headlight operates via its own AC output directly from the stator and is not backed up by the battery.  Under each “symptom” listed below, most popular bikes are listed in groupings with their own specific troubleshooting procedures.

Early “first generation” Baja Designs Kits (identifiable by having a rocker type main power switch mounted in a bracket on the handlebar clamp) came with a device called an FET switch that switched the headlight on with the start of the engine instead of the throw of the switch. This was included as a feature to help save battery charge.  If you have one of these early kits and the headlight has failed, proceed to the FET testing procedure.

Headlight does not turn on (with or without the engine running)

CRF250/450X’s, ’00-on KTM EXC/MXC/XC 4-strokes, TTR50/125 electric-starts, KLX/DRZ110’s, and XR400/600/650R’s (with Baja Designs rewound stator) These bikes all have dual-output stators.  They power the headlight via a devoted AC output from the stator (no battery backup) so their headlights do not come on until the engine is started.  If the headlight does not come on with the start of the engine, start by checking the wire connections from relay mounted behind the headlight.  The relay controls the high/low beam function of the headlight.  On each one of these bikes, the specific location AC power is picked up for the headlight varies.  Download the Dual Sport Kit installation manual and/or stator instructions for your bike and verify the wire connections are correct.  If the connections are correct, use a voltmeter to test for AC voltage with the engine running at the wire from the harness that the blue (orange on TTR’s) wire from the relay attaches to.  Use the chassis for ground.  This wire should show about 12.5 ACV on the meter with the engine running.  If there is very low or no AC voltage on this wire and the connections are good, the stock voltage regulator or switch (KTM EXC’s) may have failed.  If there is proper voltage on this wire, the relay or headlight bulb may have failed.  To test the relay, check for continuity between the blue wire (orange on TTR’s) and the green wire that goes to the headlight connector.  If they show no continuity, the relay is faulty.  If everything else checks out, remove the headlight bulb from its socket and visually inspect the filaments within the bulb.  If the bulb is good, call or email Baja Designs Technical Support.

XR/CRF’s (all) with single-output stators (stock or aftermarket),

WR’s (’03-on w/ modified stator), TTR125 kickstart/225/250’s, DRZ’s & KLX’s (all except 110), KDX’s, DR250/350’s, KTM 2-strokes, Pre ’00 KTM 4-strokes, 625SXC’s

These bikes all have single output stators.  They power the headlight via the same DC (battery) hot lead that powers the rest of the kit accessories.  Assuming the battery is charged, the headlight on these bikes should come on when the low or high beam is selected whether or not the engine is running. If you have one of these bikes and the headlight does not function (but the rest of the kit does), the problem most likely lies in either the high/low selector switch or the headlight bulb itself.  First, remove the bulb and visually inspect it.  If the filaments are broken the bulb is faulty will need to be replaced.  A faulty voltage regulator could cause this.  See thecharging system testing procedure.  If the bulb is not the problem, you will need to use a multi-meter to test continuity across the high/low switch.  To do this, unplug the white plastic six-pin connector that mates the two halves of the Baja Designs wiring harness together at the front of the bike.  In the connector on the front half of the harness, one of the pin positions will have a single blue wire coming from it.  Touch one of the probes from your meter to this (female) pin.  Unplug the headlight connector from the back of the bulb.  Touch the other probe from your meter to the green wire in the headlight connector.  Select the low-beam switch position and your meter should show perfect continuity between these two wires.  If not, the high/low switch is faulty and should be replaced.

Headlight does not switch between low and high beams:

CRF250/450X’s, KTM EXC/MXC/XC 4-strokes, TTR50/125 electric-starts, KLX/DRZ110’s, and XR400/600/650R’s (with Baja Designs rewound stator)

On these bikes, this symptom is can be caused by a faulty relay, a faulty relay connection, a faulty high beam selector switch, or a dead battery. 

The following tests should be conducted with a known good battery in the system.  If the battery voltage is below 12V, charge and load test the battery before performing this test. 

To test the switch, use a voltmeter to test for battery voltage between the yellow (hot) and black (ground) wires that attach to the relay with the high/low switch in the high beam position.  If there is no voltage at these wires, the switch is faulty.  If there is voltage, the relay is faulty or is not plugged in properly.  If everything appears to be plugged in properly see the relay testing procedure

FET Test Procedure:  The following test should be conducted with a known good battery in the system.  If the battery voltage is below 12V, charge and load test the battery before performing this test.

Note that the following test applies only to bikes with “first generation” Baja Designs kits installed.

The FET switch is a black module mounted under the seat with three wires (red, orange, & yellow) coming out. The best way to test the FET is by bypassing it.  To do this, unplug the red and orange wires from their corresponding mates coming from the wiring harness.  Leave the yellow wire attached.  Next, plug the red and orange wires from the wiring harness (not the FET) into each other.  This will be a male/female connection.  With these wires joined, click the main power (rocker) switch into the on position.  If the headlight comes on, the FET switch is faulty. You may either replace the FET (contact Baja Designs) or just simply run the bike with it bypassed, as this will cause no harm to the electrical system.

RELAY TEST PROCEDURE: The following test must be conducted with a good test battery and a digital ohm-meter. 

The relay is a black cube-shaped device mounted inside the headlight that switches the high/low function of the headlight on bikes with dual output stators.  These bikes include (but are not limited to) electric-start KTM’s, CRF X’s, & rewound XR400’s, 600’s, & 650R’s.

There are two separate circuits on the relay.  One circuit is the “trigger” side; the other circuit is the switched “load” side.   Unplug the wiring that attaches to the relay to expose the 5 prongs.  Looking at the relay so there are two horizontal. 


TAILLIGHT:


THE RUNNING LIGHT AND/OR BRAKE LIGHT DO NOT FUNCTION:

If the running light functions but the brake light does not, the problem is either in the taillight, or the brake light switch.

If the brake light functions but the running light does not, the problem is most likely the taillight itself.

If neither the running light nor the brake light function, the problem is either in the taillight or the main power switch.

Read first before testing: The following tests should be conducted with a known good battery in the system.  If the battery voltage is below 12V, charge and load test the battery before performing this test. 

Taillight Test Procedure: Unplug the taillight leads from the wiring harness and touch them directly to a good 12V battery.  Black is the ground wire – touch it to the negative side of the battery.  Red is the running light power lead; blue is the brake light power lead.  Touch the red & blue wires to the positive side of the battery and the running light & brake light should come on respectively.  If not, either the bulb is burned out, the bulb is making a poor connection, or if it is an LED taillight, the LED cluster has failed.

If the running light & brake light both function when powered directly but only the running light works when plugged in to the wiring harness, the brake light switch may be the problem.  To test, bypass the brake switch by unplugging the two wires from the wiring harness that attach to it and touch them together.  If doing this lights the brake light, the brake switch has failed or needs adjustment.

If the running light & brake light both function when powered directly but do not function when plugged into the wiring harness, use a voltmeter to check for DC voltage between the red & black wires (power & ground) from the gray cable that the taillight plugs into.  These wires should show battery voltage any time the main power switch is in the on position.  If not, go to the main power switch testing procedure.


HORN:


A non-functioning horn can be caused one of three things.  Either the horn itself is bad or out of adjustment, the horn button has failed, or the main power switch has failed.

Read first before testing: The following tests should be conducted with a known good battery in the system.  If the battery voltage is below 12V, charge and load test the battery before performing this test. 

Horn Test Procedures: Unplug the two terminals that attach to the two tabs on the back of the horn.  Touch the two tabs from the horn to the hot & ground sides of a known good 12V battery (polarity is unimportant.) 

If the horn does not honk under direct power it is either out of adjustment or failed.  Try turning the small Phillips head adjustment screw on the back of the horn in and out with power attached.  This screw adjusts tension on the plate and sometimes requires adjustment if moisture has entered the horn.  If the horn still cannot be made to honk after turning the adjustment screw it will need to be replaced.

If the horn honks under direct power but not when plugged into the wiring harness the horn button or main power switch is the problem.  Proceed to the horn button testing procedure and the main power switch testing procedure.

SWITCH PANEL TESTING:


This section covers the testing procedures of all the switch panel assembly switch functions.  These functions include the main power switch, the high/low beam switch, the kill button, the turn signal switch, and the horn button.  A meter that tests for continuity (ohm resistance) is necessary to properly perform all of these tests.

Main Power Switch Testing Procedure: Unplug the plastic connector that mates the switch panel to the wiring harness.  One of the pin positions in the connector from the switch panel will have a blue wire; another will have a red wire.  The blue wire feeds power into the switch; the red wire is the switched power lead out.  If the main power switch is functioning properly, these two wires should show no continuity with the thumb switch in the lowest (off) position and perfect continuity in any of the upper switch positions.  If no continuity is shown in any position, the main power switch has failed and should be replaced.

High/Low Beam Switch Testing Procedure (kick-start bikes with single output stators): Unplug the plastic connector that mates the switch panel to the wiring harness.  One of the pin positions in the connector from the switch will have a blue wire that feeds power into the switch.  This blue wire should show perfect continuity with the green wire in the headlight connector when the switch is in the low beam position and perfect continuity with the yellow wire in the headlight connector when in the high beam position.  If there is no continuity between these wires in any switch position, the main power switch has failed and should be replaced.

High/Low Beam Switch Testing Procedure (electric-start bikes with dual output stators): On these bikes the high/low function is switched via a separate relay mounted to the headlight.  The high/low switch triggers the relay in the high beam position but does not switch power to the headlight bulb.

Unplug the plastic connector that mates the switch panel to the wiring harness.  One of the pin positions in the connector from the switch will have a blue wire that feeds power into the switch.  This blue wire should show perfect continuity with the yellow wire that attaches to the yellow wire from the relay when the high/low switch is in the high beam position.  If there is no continuity between these wires in the high beam switch position, the main power switch has failed and should be replaced.  If there is continuity between these two wires in the high beam switch position but the headlight does not function (or does not switch from low to high beam), the relay is likely the problem.  See relay testing procedure.

Kill Button Testing Procedure:  The Baja Designs switch panel assembly has two separate kill switches.  One is the button on the front of the switch panel; the other is the main power (thumb) switch.

On newer kits that have the high beam indicator integrated into the switch panel, there will be black/white & blue/white wire pair coming from the switch panel wiring that are sheathed separate from the other wires.  These are the kill wires.  They should show perfect continuity when either the main power switch is in the lowest (off) position or when the kill button is pressed.  If they do not show continuity in any position or show continuity in all positions, the kill function has failed and the switch should be replaced.

On older kits that have a separate high beam indicator mounted to the handlebar -*clamp, there will be a black/white & green/yellow wire pair coming from the switch panel wiring that are sheathed separate from the other wires.  These are the kill wires.  They should show perfect continuity whenever the main power switch is in the lowest (off) position.  If they do not show continuity in any position or show continuity in all positions, the kill function has failed and the switch should be replaced.

Turn Signal Switch Testing Procedure: To test the turn signal switch, unplug the orange wire from the flasher relay and both of the front turn signals.  The orange wire should show perfect continuity with the brown wire that goes to the left turn signal anytime the turn signal switch is in the left position and continuity with the green wire that goes to the right turn signal anytime the switch is in the right position.  There should be no continuity between the orange wire and any other wire when the turns signal switch is in its middle (off) position.  If the switch does not test as outlined above, it is failed and should be replaced.

Horn Button Testing Procedure: To test the horn button, unplug the two wire terminals from the horn.  Attach one probe from your ohmmeter to the pink (gray on older kits) wire; attach the other probe to any ground wire in the Baja Designs wiring harness.  There should be continuity when the button is pressed.  If there is no continuity when the button is pressed the horn button has failed. 


FUSE BLOWING:


When a fuse blows, it is the result of electrical current rushing to a short circuit.  There are several situations that .  The two most common causes of a fuse to blow are the brake switch wires being melted on the exhaust and the wiring behind the headlight being caught in steering stops.  If visual inspection of these parts does not show any obvious problem, often a process of elimination is the best method of tracking down a short circuit.

NI-CAD BATTERY CHARGING & LOAD TESTING:

Baja Designs uses .7Ah ni-cad batteries in many of our dual sport kits & HID lighting systems.  These batteries typically have a 2-3 year operating life if properly maintained.  To properly evaluate one of these batteries, it must first be charged and then load tested.


CHARGING: 

Baja Designs recommends charging the battery with a 500mA (.5A) battery charger for about one hour or until the stabilized open circuit battery voltage reaches 13-14 volts.  Using chargers with a higher Amp rating can potentially damage the battery.


Load Testing: 

Once charged, attach a voltmeter to the battery and plug it into the dual sport kit or some other 12V draw (preferably around 35W.)  If you plug the battery into the dual sport kit you should be able to operate all of the lighting accessories without the engine running for at least 30 seconds and the battery voltage should show a slow linear drop.   If the voltage drops quickly and the lighting dims out, the battery is likely bad and should be replaced.  

DC CHARGING TEST FOR KICKSTART BIKES W/ NICAD BATTERIES:

-You must have a working voltmeter that can read DC voltage in order to perform this test.

-For best results the battery should be fully charged when performing this test.

If the battery and regulator are located under the seat, remove the seat to access these components.

If the battery and regulator are mounted behind the headlight number plate, remove the upper headlight mounts and push the headlight forward for easier access to these components.

Set the voltmeter to DC voltage and attach the probes to the battery connections. Polarity is important, so red goes to positive and black goes to negative. The battery must remain connected to the voltage regulator for the entire test so you may have to pull back the rubber covers in order to connect the meter and the battery leads.

Once the meter is connected start the bike and watch the voltage. The voltage levels should rise and fall with RPMs (i.e. higher RPMs, higher voltage).

Desired voltage is 13.6vdc-14vdc at mid to high RPMs. If the voltage is higher (15vdc or more) or does not fluctuate at all with the throttle, the voltage regulator is most likely bad. Replacement regulators are available through Baja Designs directly.

If the voltage fluctuates with RPM but does not reach the desired levels, or reaches the desired levels at very highRPMs, you may be demanding too much from the bike’s stator. If you have changed the headlight bulb or added extra lights or components your bike may not have sufficient output to support the extra draw. Call our Tech line for assistance in these cases.